Art Knowledge News - Keeping You in Touch with the World of Art...Nov. 9, 2011




Art Knowledge News - Keeping You in Touch with the World of Art...


The Albertina Opens "René Magritte ~ The Pleasure Principle"

Posted: 08 Nov 2011 11:42 PM PST

artwork: artwork: René Magritte - "Le baiser", 1951 - Oil on canvas - Collection of the Houston Museum of Fine Arts. © VBK Vienna, 2011. On view at the Albertina, Vienna in "René Magritte: The Pleasure Principle" from November 9th until February 26th 2012.

Vienna.- The Albertina is proud to present "René Magritte: The Pleasure Principle" on view at the museum from November 9th through February 26th 2012. A selection of more than 100 works from around the world will cover every creative phase of the artist, retracing Magritte's artistic career. Conceived in collaboration with the Tate Liverpool, the exhibition addresses hitherto little-explored aspects of Magritte's life and artistic activity. It focuses on his use of patterns and recurring objects, the subject of covering and unveiling, visual breaks and eroticism in his oeuvre. On the basis of Magritte's most important works and early commercial pieces, the exhibition examines the connection between the artist's paintings and his work for the advertising industry as well as the influence of pop culture. Drawings and collages, rarely shown photographs and films will also be on display in the exhibition.


artwork: René Magritte - "Le paysage de Baucis", 1966 Oil on canvas - Collection of the Houston Museum of Fine Arts. © VBK Vienna, 2011. René Magritte was born in Lessines, in the province of Hainaut, in 1898, the eldest son of Léopold Magritte, who was a tailor and textile merchant,  and Régina (née Bertinchamps), a milliner until her marriage. Little is known about Magritte's early life, but he began lessons in drawing in 1910. On 12 March 1912, his mother committed suicide by drowning herself in the River Sambre. This was not her first attempt; she had made many over a number of years, driving her husband Léopold to lock her into her bedroom. One day she escaped, and was missing for days. She was later discovered a mile or so down the nearby river, dead. According to a legend, 13-year-old Magritte was present when her body was retrieved from the water, but recent research has discredited this story, which may have originated with the family nurse. Supposedly, when his mother was found, her dress was covering her face, an image that has been suggested as the source of several of Magritte's paintings in 1927–1928 of people with cloth obscuring their faces, including Les Amants. Magritte's earliest paintings, which date from about 1915, were Impressionistic in style. From 1916 to 1918 he studied at the Académie Royale des Beaux-Arts in Brussels, under Constant Montald, but found the instruction uninspiring.

The paintings he produced during the years 1918–1924 were influenced by Futurism and by the offshoot of Cubism practiced by Metzinger. Most of his works of this period are female nudes. In 1922 Magritte married Georgette Berger, whom he had met as a child in 1913. From December 1920 until September 1921, Magritte served in the Belgian infantry in the Flemish town of Beverlo near Leopoldsburg. In 1922–1923, he worked as a draughtsman in a wallpaper factory, and was a poster and advertisement designer until 1926, when a contract with Galerie le Centaure in Brussels made it possible for him to paint full-time. In 1926, Magritte produced his first surreal painting, "The Lost Jockey (Le jockey perdu)", and held his first exhibition in Brussels in 1927.

artwork: René Magritte - "The Spirit of Geometry", 1937, Gouache on paper Collection of the Tate, London. -  © VBK Wien, 2011. On view at the Albertina, Vienna in "René Magritte" until February 26th 2012.

Critics heaped abuse on the exhibition. Depressed by the failure, he moved to Paris where he became friends with André Breton, and became involved in the surrealist group. Galerie la Centaure closed at the end of 1929, ending Magritte's contract income. Having made little impact in Paris, Magritte returned to Brussels in 1930 and resumed working in advertising. He and his brother, Paul, formed an agency which earned him a living wage. Surrealist patron Edward James allowed Magritte, in the early stages of his career, to stay rent free in his London home and paint. James is featured in two of Magritte's pieces, "Le Principe du Plaisir (The Pleasure Principle)" and "La Reproduction Interdite", a painting also known as "Not to be Reproduced". During the German occupation of Belgium in World War II he remained in Brussels, which led to a break with Breton. He briefly adopted a colorful, painterly style in 1943–44, an interlude known as his "Renoir Period", as a reaction to his feelings of alienation and abandonment that came with living in German-occupied Belgium. In 1946, renouncing the violence and pessimism of his earlier work, he joined several other Belgian artists in signing the manifesto 'Surrealism in Full Sunlight'. During 1947–48—Magritte's "Vache Period" — he painted in a provocative and crude Fauve style.

During this time, Magritte supported himself through the production of faked works purporting to be by Pablo Picasso, Georges Braque and Giorgio de Chirico - a fraudulent repertoire he was later to expand into the printing of forged banknotes during the lean postwar period. This venture was undertaken alongside his brother Paul Magritte and fellow Surrealist and 'surrogate son' Marcel Mariën, to whom had fallen the task of selling the forgeries. At the end of 1948, he returned to the style and themes of his prewar surrealistic art. His work was exhibited in the United States in New York in 1936 and again in that city in two retrospective exhibitions, one at the Museum of Modern Art in 1965, and the other at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1992. Magritte died of pancreatic cancer on 15 August 1967 in his own bed, and was interred in Schaerbeek Cemetery, Evere, Brussels. Popular interest in Magritte's work rose considerably in the 1960s, and his imagery has influenced pop, minimalist and conceptual art. In 2005 he came 9th in the Walloon version of De Grootste Belg (The Greatest Belgian); in the Flemish version he was 18th.

artwork: René Magritte - "L'assasin menacé/Der bedrohte Mörder", 1927 - Oil on canvas The Museum of Modern Art, NY-  © Charly HERSCOVICI Brussels - © VBK Vienna.

The Albertina is a museum in the Innere Stadt (First District) of Vienna, Austria. It houses one of the largest and most important print rooms in the world with approximately 65,000 drawings and approximately 1 million old master prints, as well as more modern graphic works, photographs and architectural drawings. Apart from the graphics collection the museum has recently acquired on permanent loan two significant collections of Impressionist and early 20th century art, some of which will be on permanent display. The museum also houses temporary exhibitions. Vienna's Albertina was erected on one of the last remaining sections of the fortifications of Vienna, the Augustian Bastion. In 1745, it was refurbished by the director of the Hofbauamt, Emanuel Teles Count Silva-Tarouca, to become his palace. The building was later taken over by Duke Albert of Saxen-Teschen. He used it as his residence and later brought his graphics collection there from Brussels, where he had acted as the governor of the Habsburg Netherlands. For that purpose, he had the building extended by Louis Montoyer. Since then, the palace has immediately bordered the Hofburg. The collection was expanded by Albert's successors. The collection was created by Duke Albert with the Genoese count Giacomo Durazzo (Austrian ambassador in Venice). In 1776 the count presented nearly 1,000 pieces of art to Duke Albert and his wife Maria Christina (Maria Theresia's daughter). Count Giacomo Durazzo – brother of Marcello Durazzo (Doge of Genoa) – "wanted to create a collection for posterity that served higher purposes than all others: education and the power of morality should distinguish his collection...." In the 1820s Archduke Charles, the foster son of Duke Albert and Maria Christina, initiated further modifications of the building by Joseph Kornhäusel, which affected mostly the interior decoration. After Archduke Charles, his son Archduke Albrecht and then Albrecht's nephew Archduke Friedrich, Duke of Teschen lived in the building. In early 1919, the building and the collection passed from the Habsburgs into the ownership of the Republic of Austria. In 1920, the collection of prints and drawings was unified with the collection of the former imperial court library. The name Albertina was established in 1921. In March 1945, the Albertina was heavily damaged by bomb attacks. The Albertina was completely refurbished and modernized from 1998 to 2003, but the graphics collection did not reopen until 2008. Visit the museum's website at ... http://www.albertina.at

Swann Galleries to Offer Rare & Important Travel Posters in November 11th Auction

Posted: 08 Nov 2011 10:04 PM PST

artwork: Lucien Boucher - "Air France / De Jour et de Nui" - Advertising poster - 63 x 98.5 cm. - Courtesy Swann Galleries, New York, where the poster will be auctioned on November 11th. Estimate $2,000-3,000

New York City.- Swann Galleries' annual auction of Rare & Important Travel Posters on Friday, November 11th offers many seldom-seen images from around the world, and marks the first time several of them have come to auction. A strong selection of British posters includes Frederick C. Herrick's "London's Underground/Nightly Carnival", 1924 ($3,000 to $4,000); one of the two golf posters designed by Tom Purvis for Cruden Bay, circa 1925 ($10,000 to $15,000); Montague Birrell Black's futuristic view of London in "This Is All in the Air/To-day–the Solid Comfort of the Underground", 1926 ($5,000 to $7,500); and Henry George Gawthorn's cheerful beach image, Redcar, 1930 ($8,000 to $12,000). A colorful assortment of Canadian posters also features an image by Tom Purvis, this one with an elegant woman in a wide-brimmed hat leaning against a cruise ship's rail, called "Canadian Pacific/Happy Cruises", 1937 ($4,000 to $6,000).


The Cantor Arts Center Presents "The Legend of Rex Slinkard"

Posted: 08 Nov 2011 09:43 PM PST

artwork: Rex Slinkard - "Young Rivers", circa 1915-1916 - Oil on canvas - Courtesy the Cantor Arts Center. On view in "The Legend of Rex Slinkard" from November 9th until February 26th, 2012.

Stanford, CA.- The Cantor Arts Center is proud to present "The Legend of Rex Slinkard", on view at the museum from November 9th through February 26th, 2012. This exhibition of more than 60 works includes oil paintings, charcoal drawings, and pen-and-watercolor sketches that convey the breadth and strength of Slinkard's short-lived artistic development. The Cantor Arts Center is the primary repository of paintings and sketches by the early 20th-century California artist Rex Slinkard (1887–1918), who died in the influenza epidemic of 1918 while he was serving in the military. During his brief life, Slinkard emerged from his roots as a California rancher to become a painter who helped influence the modernist bent of the emerging California art scene. He studied with Robert Henri in New York City, where he shared a studio with George Bellows and established personal contacts with well-known people in the worlds of visual and literary arts, before returning to Los Angeles, where he painted and taught.


The Kunsthaus Bregenz Presents "VALIE EXPORT - Archive"

Posted: 08 Nov 2011 08:39 PM PST

artwork: VALIE EXPORT - "Ein perfektes Paar oder die Unzucht wechselt ihre Haut", 1986 - Video film - Color photograph, set photo - 12.7 x 18.5 cm. - Courtesy Charim Galerie, Vienna. © VALIE EXPORT/VBK, Vienna, 2011. On view at the Kunsthaus Bregenz in "VALIE EXPORT/Archive", on view until January 22nd 2012.

Bregenz, Austria.- The Kunsthaus Bregenz (KUB) is proud to present "VALIE EXPORT/Archive", on view through January 22nd 2012. This exhibition provides the opportunity to rediscover new aspects of an internationally renowned artist whose works are counted among the canon of 20th century art history and represented in many important museum collections. In this unusual and surprising presentation at the Kunsthaus Bregenz, in part, works that hitherto have not been exhibited will be on show. In addition, for the first time in her long history of exhibitions, VALIE EXPORT is providing insights into her comprehensive archive that, to the present day, remains inaccessible to the broad public. This presentation makes apparent once again that VALIE EXPORT is not only a pioneer of experimental film and cinema, but also the protagonist of a feminist, socially critical art. Apart from that, her projects and texts provide evidence that she has a decisive influence to the present day, not only as an artist, but also as a curator and theorist.


The Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art Opens on November 11th

Posted: 08 Nov 2011 08:20 PM PST

artwork: Mary McCleary - "The Falcon Cannot Hear the Falconer", 2008 - Mixed media collage on paper - 100.3 x 128.9 cm. - Courtesy of the artist & Moody Gallery, Collection of the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, Arkansas. The Museum opens to the public on November 11th

Bentonville, Arkansas.- The new Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art opens on November 11th. The Museum takes its name from nearby Crystal Spring and the bridge construction incorporated in the building design by world-renowned architect Moshe Safdie. A series of pavilions nestled around two creek-fed ponds will house galleries, meeting and classroom spaces, and a large, glass-enclosed gathering hall. Visitor amenities will also include a café on a glass-enclosed bridge overlooking the ponds and a Marlon Blackwell-designed museum store. Sculpture and walking trails will link the Museum's 120-acre park and gardens to downtown Bentonville, Arkansas. Alice Walton, the daughter of Wal-Mart founder Sam Walton, spearheaded the Walton Family Foundation's involvement in developing Crystal Bridges. In the past few years, Crystal Bridges has been in the news for numerous arrangements and partnerships with other art galleries to share collections as well as its spending at auction to secure its collection in time for the opening.


The Fondazione Nicola Trussardi Presents First Solo Exhibition of Work by Pipilotti Rist

Posted: 08 Nov 2011 07:35 PM PST

artwork: Pipilotti Rist - "Cape Cod Chandelier", 2011 - Video installation - 244 x 155 cm. - Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth.  - On view at the former Cinema Manzoni, Milan in the Fondazione Nicola Trussardi organized "Parasimpatico" from November 9th until December 18th.

Milan, Italy.- The Fondazione Nicola Trussardi is proud to present "Parasimpatico", the first major solo exhibition in Italy of work by Pipilotti Rist, on view at the former Cinema Manzoni from November 9th through December 18th. The setting for the Swiss artist's new project is the former Cinema Manzoni, which for over fifty years was one of the most important movie theaters in Milan, and has been closed to the public since 2006. Pipilotti Rist is one of the most highly respected, unconventional voices in art today: she has had solo shows in the world's best-known museums—including MoMA in New York and Centre Pompidou in Paris—and has participated in major international events such as the Venice Biennale and the biennials of Berlin, Sydney and Lyon. In 2009 she presented her first feature-length film, Pepperminta, at the Venice Film Festival.


Phillips de Pury & Company's NYC Contemporary Art Part 1 auction totals $71,292,500

Posted: 08 Nov 2011 07:34 PM PST

artwork: Andy Warhol - "Nine Gold Marilyns" (Reversal Series), 1980. -  Est: $7,000,000 - $10,000,000. Sold at: $7,922,500. Photo: Courtesy of Phillips de Pury & Company.

NEW YORK, N.Y.- Phillips de Pury & Company's Contemporary Art Part I totals: $71,292,500, selling 94 % by value and 85% by lot in a lively and packed auction room. The Contemporary Art Benefit auction for the Solomon R Guggenheim Foundation totaled $2,682,000, selling 93% by value and 95% by lot. "We were very happy to lend our support to the Guggenheim Museum. The Benefit Auction was the ideal prelude to what overall was a very successful evening." Simon de Pury, Chairman of Philips de Pury & Company. "Tonight's excellent results demonstrate the depth of the market. We saw consistent participation throughout and steady results in line with our expectations." Michael McGinnis, Senior Director and Worldwide Head of Contemporary Art.

PINTA ~ The Latin American Fair in New York Celebrates Its Fifth Anniversary

Posted: 08 Nov 2011 07:08 PM PST

artwork: Manuel Mendive  (b. 1944) - Se Alimenta mi Espirit, (2007) - Acrylic on canvas, 64 ¾

New York City.- PINTA , the Latin American fair of modern and contemporary art, runs from November 10th through November 13th. This year the fair will have a brand new look when it opens its doors in the heart of New York. The new location at 7 West 34th Street in Manhattan will accommodate fifty galleries and projects from the United States, Latin America and Europe that will showcase their best Latin American artists. For the fifth year in a row, New York will see some of the best modern art, including work by masters of painting and sculpture from Latin America such as Fernando Botero , Manuel Mendive , Rufino Tamayo , Wifredo Lam and Roberto Matta ; even as geometric abstraction and concrete art have been our signature since the first edition of the fair in 2007.


The Delaware Art Museum Celebrates its 100th Anniversary With a Howard Pyle Retrospective

Posted: 08 Nov 2011 06:08 PM PST

artwork: Howard Pyle - "The Attack Upon the Chew House", 1898 - Oil on canvas - 23 1/4" x 35 1/4" - Collection of the Delaware Art Museum. On view in "Howard Pyle: American Master Rediscovered" from November 12th through March 4th 2012.

Wilmington, DE.- Howard Pyle (1853 – 1911) was one of America's most popular illustrators and storytellers during a period of explosive growth in the publishing industry. A celebrity in his lifetime, Pyle's widely circulated images of pirates, knights, and historical figures were featured in publications such as Harper's Monthly and were admired by artists and authors like Vincent Van Gogh and Mark Twain. Yet, despite his widespread popularity, Pyle's reputation has survived only among illustration scholars and enthusiasts. Until now his work has been virtually omitted from the larger context of art history. In celebration of the centenary of Pyle's death, the Delaware Art Museum is pleased to present "Howard Pyle: American Master Rediscovered", a major retrospective exhibition featuring 79 paintings and drawings created by Pyle between 1876 and 1910, on view November 12th through March 4th 2012. This exhibition presents a fresh perspective on Pyle's familiar images, exploring his interaction with the art and culture of his time and effectively repositioning him within the broader spectrum of 19th-century art.


artwork: Howard Pyle - "The Rush From the New York Stock Exchange on September 18, 1873", 1895 Oil on panel - 18" x 11 7/8" Collection the Delaware Art Museum. This retrospective exhibition also marks the 100th anniversary of the Delaware Art Museum, which was founded in 1912 to preserve and exhibit Pyle's work following his untimely death in November 1911. The Museum's Centennial Celebration begins in November 2011 with the opening of "Howard Pyle: American Master Rediscovered" and ends in June 2013 with the exhibition "Indelible Impressions: Contemporary Illustrators and Howard Pyle". Pyle's unique approach to the art of illustration was honed through the intensive, self-directed study of the art of his time, which he experienced both in the original as well as through illustrated periodicals and books, reproductive prints, and fine art reproductions. "Howard Pyle: American Master Rediscovered" will include Pyle's paintings alongside related works by contemporary American and European artists to show these fine art cross-currents.

artwork: Howard Pyle - "We Started to Run Back to the Raft for Our Lives", 1902 Oil on canvas - 24 1/4" x 16 1/4" Collection - Delaware Art Museum. Three key themes represented in Pyle's work will be highlighted in this exhibition:  Visions of the Past concentrates on Pyle's depictions of history, including Roman gladiators and Medieval knights. His views of the classical world drew inspiration from the work of the French academic artist Jean-Leon Gérôme (1824 – 1904) and his numerous depictions of the Middle Ages show how conversant Pyle was with the works of the 19th-century Pre-Raphaelites. Pyle's pirate imagery is based on his own personal archive of costume books and historic manuscripts; however, his use of strong diagonals, flat compositional arrangements, and restrained placement of color suggests an understanding of the art world's new-found interest in Japanese ukiyo-e prints. The contemporary art world was obsessed with Japanese art as reflected in the work of James McNeill Whistler, James Tissot, and Edgar Degas, among others. Fairytale and Fantasy will focus on Pyle's fairy tales and children's illustrations, which show his knowledge of European illustrators, including Walter Crane (1845 – 1915) and Kate Greenaway (1846 – 1901).

His depictions of the world of make-believe also reflect many of the themes and methods of European Aesthetic and Symbolist art.  America – Past and Present highlights Pyle's enthusiasm for the American Colonial Revival of the 1880s, which celebrated the history of the United States. Many of Pyle's iconic Revolutionary War scenes seem to have been strengthened by knowledge of the work of the French Salon artist, Jean-Louis-Ernest Meissonier (1814 – 1891), whose military scenes of the Napoleonic Wars were immensely popular.

Founded in 1912, the Delaware Art Museum is best known for its large collection of works by Wilmington native Howard Pyle and fellow American illustrators; a major collection of British Pre-Raphaelite art; and urban landscapes by John Sloan and his circle. Visitors can also enjoy the outdoor Copeland Sculpture Garden and a number of exhibitions throughout the year. The Delaware Art Museum is an art museum located on the Kentmere Parkway in Wilmington, Delaware, and holds a collection of more than 12,000 works.

The museum, founded in 1912 by the Wilmington Society of the Fine Arts in honor of the artist Howard Pyle, focuses on American art and illustration from the 19th to the 21st century as well as the English Pre-Raphaelite movement of the mid-19th century.Newly renovated and expanded, the Delaware Art Museum offers a 9-acre (36,000 m2) Sculpture Park, the Helen Farr Sloan Library & Archives, studio art classes, an interactive Kids' Corner learning area, the delART Café featuring free Wi-Fi access, and the Museum Store with distinctive books and gifts. Visit the museum's website at ...http://www.delart.org

Edward Hopper : Major Exhibit at the National Gallery of Art

Posted: 08 Nov 2011 05:49 PM PST

artwork: Edward Hopper Tables For Ladies

WASHINGTON, DC - Edward Hopper marks the first time in more than 25 years that a comprehensive exhibition of this great artist's work has been seen in American museums outside New York and is the most complete survey of his career ever presented in Washington. The exhibition of 96 paintings and works on paper focuses on the period of the artist's great achievements—from about 1925 to mid century—when he produced such iconic paintings as Automat (1927), Drug Store (1927), Early Sunday Morning (1930), New York Movie (1939), and Nighthawks (1942).

Edward Hopper is organized by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, where it debuted May 6 through August 19, 2007; National Gallery of Art, Washington, on view September 16, 2007 through January 21, 2008; and The Art Institute of Chicago, where it will be seen February 16 through May 11, 2008.

artwork: Edward Hopper Summertime"The National Gallery is pleased to present this new exploration of the career of Edward Hopper, an artist who produced some of the outstanding masterpieces of modern American art," said Earl A. Powell III, director, National Gallery of Art. "We are pleased to join the Museum of Fine Arts and the Art Institute of Chicago in investigating how his images were seen in his own time. We welcome the sponsorship of Booz Allen Hamilton, who helped bring this important show to our nation's capital."

Exhibition Organization and Sponsor - The exhibition at the National Gallery of Art in Washington is made possible by a generous grant from the global consulting firm Booz Allen Hamilton Inc.

The Artist and the Exhibition - The classic works of Edward Hopper (1882–1967) capture the realities of urban and rural American life with a poignancy and beauty that have placed them among the most enduring and popular images of the 20th century. This exhibition of 48 oil paintings, 34 watercolors, 12 prints, and two ledger books, arranged chronologically and thematically, reveals Hopper as a creator of compelling images who produced remarkably subtle and painterly effects in both oil and watercolor. It also examines how his images were seen by his contemporaries in the middle decades of the century.

artwork: Edward Hopper Lighthouse At Two LightsFrom the late 1920s, Hopper was recognized as one of the most profound American artists, praised for his mastery at painting light, for his direct, eloquent realism, and for his unique sensitivity to modern American life. He excelled as a painter in oils, as a watercolorist, and as a printmaker, and this exhibition presents his greatest work in all three media. The assembled art includes some of Hopper's best-loved images as well as seldom seen works of extraordinary quality and power.

 A group of paintings and prints from the 1910s introduces his signature subjects, and reveals his beginnings as an artist influenced by both the American Ashcan school and a fin-de-siècle sensibility to which he was exposed during student years in Paris. The core of the exhibition is dedicated to the mature, highly original images for which he is justly famous: majestic Maine lighthouses; Manhattan apartments, restaurants, and theaters; and the old-fashioned houses of Gloucester and Cape Cod. Hopper's career spanned six decades, and in his epic late paintings, created during the ascendancy of abstract expressionism, he remained a staunch realist, his style marked by increasing simplicity and austerity.

Catalogue and Curators - The 264-page, fully illustrated exhibition catalogue, with 170 color and 15 black-and-white illustrations, includes essays by exhibition co-curators Carol Troyen, the Kristin and Roger Servison curator of paintings, Art of the Americas, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and Judith Barter, the Field-McCormick Chair of American Art at The Art Institute of Chicago, and others. The catalogue is available for sale in the Gallery Shops for $45 (softcover) and $65 (hardcover). To order, call (800) 697-9350 or (202) 842-6002; fax (202) 789-3047; or e-mail mailorder@nga.gov . The exhibition curators are Carol Troyen, Franklin Kelly (senior curator, American and British paintings, National Gallery of Art), and Judith Barter. Visit : www.nga.gov

National Gallery Of Art exhibition Honors Chester Dale & His Major Gifts

Posted: 08 Nov 2011 05:48 PM PST

artwork: Mary Cassatt (American, 1844-1926) - The Boating Party, 1893 - Oil on Canvas - Overall: 90 x 117.3 cm (35 7/16 x 46 3/16 in.) Chester Dale Collection at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC

WASHINGTON, DC.- New York investment broker Chester Dale's 1962 bequest made the National Gallery of Art one of the leading repositories in North America of French art of the late-19th and early 20th centuries. From Impressionism to Modernism: The Chester Dale Collection, on view in the Gallery's West Building from January 31, 2010 through July 31, 2011, will bring together 81 of the finest French and American paintings that Dale and his wife Maud, an artist and critic, assembled from the 1920s through the 1950s. The exhibition and its accompanying book will explore the Dales' passion and talent for acquiring great art. Many of the works in the show are among the most renowned masterpieces in the history of art, but due to a stipulation in the bequest, may only be seen at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC.

Tate Modern Announces "Arshile Gorky: A Major Retrospective"

Posted: 08 Nov 2011 05:47 PM PST

artwork: Arshile Gorky -  Abstraction with a Palette, c. 1930, Oil on Canvas Courtesy of the Philadelphia Museum of Art

LONDON.- Tate Modern will present the first major retrospective of Arshile Gorky (c.1904-1948) to be seen in Europe for twenty years. Celebrating one of the most powerful and poetic American artists of his generation, "Arshile Gorky: A Retrospective" will examine the extraordinary contribution of this seminal figure in Abstract Expressionism. The exhibition will span Gorky's 25 year career and offer the opportunity to see this complex and moving body of work as a whole. It will include more than 150 paintings and works on paper, many of which have not been shown in public previously. On view from 10 Februay through 3 May, 2010.

Marlene Dumas ~ Her Paintings Sell for Millions . . But Are you pro-Dumas or anti-Dumas?

Posted: 08 Nov 2011 05:46 PM PST

artwork: Marlene Dumas - "The Teacher (sub a)," 1987 (all oil on canvas) - Photo: Private Collection

Amsterdam, NL - MARLENE DUMAS'S STUDIO occupies an underheated, underfurnished ground-floor apartment on the southern side of Amsterdam. She can customarily be found in her studio at 2 or 3 in the morning, and her desire to record experience in its most extreme forms — she paints birth, sex, death and violence, for starters — has failed to bring her one inch closer to observing or recording the famed Dutch light. Tellingly, she does not like to travel, even across town. For all their moral gravity, Dumas's paintings have led a separate, rather flashy existence in the more commercial precincts of the art world.

GIORGIONE ~ the Most Enigmatic and Mysterious Artist of the Renaissance

Posted: 08 Nov 2011 05:45 PM PST

artwork: Giorgione - "Le tre età dell'uomo" - Oil on canvas, 62 x 78 cm. - Firenze, Palazzo Pitti, Galleria Palatina

CASTELFRANCO VENETO, ITALY - An ardent journey of discovery into the most enigmatic and mysterious artist of the Renaissance. An exhibition which brings together in Castelfranco Veneto, his native town, an incredible collection of the works of this great artist, who, more than any other, has aroused controversy among scholars and art historians in search of the documented facts, still lacking, giving rise to some very diverse and sometimes far-fetched interpretations of his life and works: GIORGIONE. Torrents of words and ink have flowed in the attempt to understand and interpret the man, the poetics and the true history of Giorgione. Yet this Castelfranco master, to whom some of the most important masterpieces of the Italian Renaissance have been attributed, has evaded all attempts to construct a definite biography, a definite catalogue of his works, or a generally agreed interpretation of the significance of some of his works.

Although his life and career were very brief – he died at little more than thirty years old and his activity was limited to a period of fifteen years at the most – his work nevertheless appears meaningful and revolutionary, able to influence hundreds of artists of various periods with the lyrical power of his art, his use of colour, and that new equilibrium between man and nature, leaving an inevitable and indelible mark on the development of the history of art after his death.

So the Giorgione "phenomenon" is a genuine one.

According to the most authoritative accounts, the fifth centenary of the death of Zorzi da Castelfranco, better known as Giorgione (Castelfranco Veneto 1477/78 – Venice 1510), occurs in 2010 and Castelfranco Veneto, the birthplace of the great artist and home to one of his most important works (the famous Castelfranco Altarpiece) as well as to one of the very few frescos attributed to Giorgione (Frieze of the Liberal and Mechanical Arts), is staging a wide-ranging exhibition in collaboration with the Veneto Region, which has set up the Regional Committee for the Fifth Centenary of the Death of Giorgione. The exhibition to be held at the Museo Casa Giorgione (Giorgione House Museum) was recently inaugurated in the Casa Barbarella, opening the Giorgione celebrations.

The exhibition, a challenge both from the scientific and the organizational points of view, is being staged with the essential support of the Fondazione Monte dei Paschi di Siena and the Fondazione Antonveneta, with the collaboration of the Department for Historic, Artistic and Ethnoanthropological heritage for the Provinces of Venice, Belluno, Padova and Treviso, the Province of Treviso, the Cathedral Parish of Castelfranco Veneto-Treviso Diocese and with funding from the Banca Antonveneta.

artwork: Giovanni Bellini - Vanitas olio su tavola / cm. 34 x 22 Venezia, Gallerie dell'AccademiaIt is curated by Lionello Puppi (the Chairman of the Regional Committee for the Fifth Centenary), Antonio Paolucci (Director of the Vatican Museums) and Enrico Maria dal Pozzolo (from the University of Verona) and co-produced by the Comune di Castelfranco Veneto and Villaggio Globale International. The exhibition does not intend to provide definitive answers or solutions (despite the archive research that has been conducted and the reflectographic and diagnostic examinations that have been carried out on many of the paintings) but rather to suggest, evoke and marvel, leaving it to the extraordinary works collected in this small town in the Veneto, together with the documents and evidence, to bring this remarkable account to life.

Some of the major international museums – the Hermitage in St. Petersburg, the Uffizi and Palazzo Pitti in Florence, the National Gallery in London, the Galleria Borghese and the Palazzo Venezia in Rome, the Kunsthistorisches in Vienna, the National Gallery in Edinburgh, the Gallerie dell'Accademia in Venice, the Louvre in Paris, the Ambrosiana in Milan, the Museo di Capodimonte in Naples and Castle Howard in Yorkshire – have accepted and contributed to this challenge.

The focus of this epoch-making exhibition, therefore, is on the "phenomenon" of Giorgione himself – created from the artist's works (from "The Tempest" to "The Three Ages of Man in Palazzo Pitti", from "The Sunset to the Madonna with Child at the Hermitage"), but also from the dense network of artistic and cultural connections that compete to suggest meanings, keys to interpretation, and the role and historical weight of Giorgione's art, or to provide hints for an evanescent biography and reinterpretation of the myth. The exhibition also offers, as never before, a careful and detailed analysis of the environment and cultural and spiritual context of the painter between the end of the fifteenth century and the first decade of the sixteenth century, suggesting a "system" existing around the brilliant artist, that Giorgione himself helped to develop.

Alongside the numerous paintings by Giorgione, on exceptional loan, the exhibition will also include important works by Giovanni Bellini, Vincenzo Catena (in whose workshop Giorgione is believed to have trained), Albrecht Dürer, Sebastiano del Piombo, Titian, Lorenzo Costa, Il Perugino, Cima da Conegliano, Palma il Vecchio, Boccaccio Boccacino, and Garofalo, as well as works by some of the biographers of Giorgione – Castiglioni, Pino, Vasari, and Dolce – and literary, musical and intellectual works by scholars from Petrarca to Bembo, all of whom may have contributed to the creation of the cultural milieu which is likely to have nourished Giorgione; then there are bronzes by Lombardo, Del Riccio and Severo da Ravenna, and engravings by Teniers and Zanetti that help remember the lost works of Giorgione and in particular the frescos from the Fondaco where he worked alongside Titian.

But foremost of all will be Giorgione's art – "a limpid mirror of the Renaissance at its supreme heights", according to Berenson – displayed through some core groups of works in the exhibition.

Focus is devoted to Giorgione's earliest works in a collection that has never been so complete, on display in the room at the Casa Barbarella which houses the enigmatic Frieze of the Liberal Arts. The unsettling "Saturn in Exile" perhaps the first work by Giorgione we have, on loan from the London National Gallery, is displayed beside the two works from the Gallerie degli Uffizi which usually constitute the opening items in the catalogue of the artist's works: "Moses at the Trial with Fire" and "The Judgment of Solomon".

These two paintings are without equal in the context of the period, showing the artist's absolute freedom in the compositional structure and the choice of subject; alongside these is the "Madonna with Child from the Hermitage" – which may also be ascribed to this first phase in the artist's career – in which the influence of northern European draughtsmanship is evident – and the two paintings from the Civici Musei in Padua, "Leda and the Swan" and "Pastoral Idyll," closely related to the two paintings from the Uffizi. It was reputedly during this phase that the relationship began – which was set to continue – between Giorgione and the Paduan artist Giulio Campagnola, and the exhibition displays several of Campagnola's engravings, indicative of the more refined cultural ambience of this period, including the famous Astrologer from the Albertina Museum in Vienna, presented in order to invite comparison with the suggestions and references in the iconography of the Fregio fresco.

artwork: Giorgione - "Leda e il cigno", fine XV sec. - Oil on canvas, 12 x 19 cm. Padova, Musei Civici agli Eremitani

Zorzi had a good reputation as a portrait painter. "Giorgione painted many other beautiful portraits which are scattered throughout Italy", wrote Vasari in 1568.

A significant number of works in the exhibition testify how Giorgione introduced a new taste in the concept of portrait painting into Venetian art in a very impelling way, thanks also to the indubitable, though never proven, contact he had with Leonardo da Vinci: this appears not only in the choice of a dark background or in the highlighting of objects with a strong symbolic and emblematic character, but also, and especially, in the psychological portrayal.

So beginning with "The Three Ages of Man" from the Galleria Palatina in Palazzo Pitti, which is probably a music lesson, or perhaps a metaphor for universal harmony, visitors can admire several key works in the exhibition, such as the "Portray of a Warrior" from the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna, which can probably be identified as the work mentioned by Michiel as being by Giorgione in the home of Gianantonio Venier and depicts, in the grotesque face of the bizarre figure on the right, a Leonardesque creation.

The exhibition continues with the painting on loan from the National Gallery in Edinburgh depicting "Portrait of a Archer" – a work which can certainly be included in the debate on the parallel between painting and sculpture, but which, owing to its state of conservation, does not allow us to affirm with certainty that it is by Giorgione, and finally the Double Portrait from the Palazzo Venezia in Rome, one of Giorgione's major portrait works and a remarkable artistic depiction with a profound sense of gestures, symbols and expressions.

Two further benchmarks in the work of this Castelfranco artist appear in the form of two key works that mark the birth of landscape painting: "The Tempest" and "The Sunset", lent respectively by the Gallerie dell'Accademia in Venice and the National Gallery in London in a great spirit of understanding for a commemorative exhibition of such importance.

Other noteworthy exhibits in this section are the drawings attributed to Campagnola and some to Giorgione himself, from the Louvre and the Uffizi, with studies of the landscape and of architecture that seem closely related to the natural protagonist of Giorgione's two masterpieces, as well as the engravings by Dürer. Similarly, it should be emphasized – in keeping with the continual references to the cultural and artistic environment in which Giorgione's art developed – how The Sunset is placed in dialogue with the marble slab of "Philoctetes" by Antonio Lombardo from the Hermitage, and with the Renaissance bronzes depicting monsters and serpents which are recalled in the sinuous stance of the young protagonist in Giorgione's painting and in the perception of monstrous beings among the dense foliage and rocks.

The last section – fascinating, inevitable, and emblematic of the critical and interpretative twists and turns that have accompanied the reconstruction of this great artist's path, shrouded in a dense cloud of uncertainties and with an absence of documentation – is presented quite explicitly this time as "The Challenges".

Challenges between the great masters of Renaissance art, who are perhaps irritated, or perhaps laughing, up there in the afterlife, to see scholars attribute the same painting first to one artist and then another – to Giorgione himself, to Titian, Sebastiano del Piombo or Perugino; challenges for the art historians, challenges for the public, challenges for those in search of definite facts and absolute truths, when the only definite fact is the excellence, the ability to leave a mark in history.

"The Madonna and Child with Saints Catherine and John the Baptist", from the Gallerie dell'Accademia in Venice, could be attributed to Sebastiano del Piombo at the beginning of his career, but many would include it among Giorgione's works.

Then there is the painting from a private collection that shares a musical theme with the two preceding works, a topic that was very dear to Giorgione according to Vasari, known as the "Concert", for which a new iconographic interpretation is offered: it is assigned to the last phase in the master's work, and appears to be of the highest artistic quality, with remarkable realistic significance, a clear expression of a tonal painting liberated from the old ideas of schematism.

Finally there are the two "Warriors": one from the National Gallery in London – once considered preparation for the saint on the left in the Castelfranco altarpiece but more recently with the dating oscillating between the early sixteenth century and a century later – and the "Warrior with Page" from Castle Howard, which very few have been lucky enough to have seen in the flesh: it is perhaps by Titian, perhaps taken from a lost work conceived by Giorgione. Perhaps.

Visit the GIORGIONE exhibition at : http://www.giorgione2010.it/

Halcyon Gallery Presents Pedro Paricio: Master Painters

Posted: 08 Nov 2011 05:44 PM PST

artwork: Pedro Paricio - "The Incredulous"  - 146 x 114 cm., Acrylic on Linen - Courtesy of Halcyon Gallery, London

LONDON.-
Halcyon Gallery present Paricio's first exhibition in London. Pedro Paricio: Master Painters is on view from May 12th through June 17th, 2011. Tipped by international critics and curators as a rising star, Spanish artist Pedro Paricio is enjoying a serious reputation in the art world, following exhibitions throughout Spain, Europe and USA. Juan Manuel Bonet, Art Critic and former Director of Museo Reina Sofia, Madrid, has described Paricio's work as "…the freshest thing I've seen in the emerging contemporary art world in 30 years". Tomas Paredes, President of the Madrid Association of Art Critics, foresees a bright future for Paricio: "Be sure that here we have a true phenomenon – a tornado – you can feel it, you can smell it, you can see it – if you miss it, you'll regret it".

"The Subject is Women" at the Nassau County Museum of Art

Posted: 08 Nov 2011 05:43 PM PST

artwork: Amedeo Modigliani - Portrait of Madame Rachele Osterlind, 1919 18 2/5 by 13 1/5 inches, Oil on canvas - Private Collection

ROSLYN HARBOR, NY.- "The Subject is Women: Impressionism and Post-Impressionism" offers a lavish viewing of works by women and works depicting women. This sumptuous exhibition will demonstrate how artists of these movements and eras depict women — and how women artists depict themselves. The works of the show, many of them vibrant oils, include renowned masters such as Cassatt, Degas, Pissarro, Renoir as well as others. Degas is represented by "Danseuse" (buste), 1900; Pissarro by "La Marché des Gisors, rue Cappeville", 1894-95; Renoir by "Jeunes filles aux lilas", c. 1890 and "Femme nue aux coussins verts", 1909 and Alfred Stevens by "Le Masque japonais", c. 1877.

The Cameron Art Museum Shows "Swamp Songs" of Clyde Connell

Posted: 08 Nov 2011 05:42 PM PST

Clyde Connell - "Memorial", 1955 - Acrylic on board glazed with oil - 23.75 x 18 cm. Private Collection, Wilmington, NC. On view at the Cameron Art Museum, Wilmongton in "Clyde Connell: Swamp Songs" until October 2nd.

Wilmington, NC.- The Cameron Art Museum is proud to present "Clyde Connell: Swamp Songs" until October 2nd. Clyde Connell's natural language is from the swamp land of Louisiana. She discovered her voice there and her artwork reflects its magical effects. In a New York Times obituary, noted art critic Roberta Smith described artist Clyde Connell's source of inspiration:  "Like Georgia O'Keefe, she drew inspiration from the region in which she lived.  She used brown earth and red clay to color her drawings and sculptures, as well as bits of iron scrap that her son, Brian, a cotton farmer, found in his fields.  She had a mystical view of nature and described her drawings as transcriptions of its music, heard on the bayou."


The Forest Lawn Museum Presents Prominent Mexican American Artists

Posted: 08 Nov 2011 05:41 PM PST

artwork: Joseph Botello - "She Wears Her Death Face", 2010 - Oil on canvas - 44" x 66" - Courtesy the Forest Lawn Museum, Glendale, CA. On view in

Glendale, CA.- The Forest Lawn Museum is proud to present "¡Adelante! Mexican American Artists: 1960s and Beyond", showing the eclectic and influential work of more than 40 prominent Hispanic artists, many who helped forge the Chicano Art Movement that began in the 1960's, as well as a number of the new generation of artists.  This extraordinary exhibit includes paintings, drawings, sculpture, and photography. "Adelante" is on view at the museum from September 9th through Sunday, January 1st 2012. This cemetery is the only place in the world containing a complete collection of replica Michelangelo's sculptures, which were made from castings taken from the originals and using marble from the same quarries in Carrara, Italy as used by Michelangelo.


Claude Monet and Abstraction Opens at Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza in Madrid

Posted: 08 Nov 2011 05:40 PM PST

artwork: 'Puesta de sol en Etretat' - Oil on Canvas - obra del pintor impresionista Claude Monet en la exposición del Museo Thyssen de Madrid

MADRID.- The Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza and Fundación Caja Madrid are presenting the exhibition Monet and Abstraction. It offers a survey of the work of the great French Impressionist painter from an innovative perspective and one never previously employed in the context of a temporary exhibition of this scale and importance, namely the artist's relationship with the development of abstraction in the second half of the 20th century. On exhibition 23 February through 30 May, 2010.

From his ethereal London landscapes to the monumental depictions of his garden at Giverny where he spent the last forty years of his life, the exhibition looks at how Claude Monet's permanent obsession with capturing the instantaneous led him to break down pictorial representation to the point of reaching the threshold of abstraction. It also analyses how, around the middle of the 20th century, the young generation of European and American abstract artists rediscovered his art and elevated the figure of Monet to the status of undisputed prophet of the material-based trends within abstraction. Monet thus came to occupy the fundamental role within the history of art that he still maintains today.

Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, Willem de Kooning, Sam Francis, Joan Mitchell, Adolph Gottlieb, André Masson, Philip Guston and Gerhard Richter were among the young artists who turned back to Monet. The present exhibition now offers the chance to see their work in the context of a fascinating dialogue with that of the Impressionist master, revealing numerous connections. Exhibiting Monet's painting in this new way allows for an analysis of the important influence that he exerted on the development of certain aspects of abstraction in the second half of the 20th century and hence his key role in the development of modern art.

More than 100 works have been assembled for this new project, jointly organized by the Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza and Fundación Caja Madrid. It has benefited from the fundamental collaboration of the Musée Marmottan Monet in Paris, where the exhibition will be seen in the summer of 2010 after its Madrid showing. The French museum has lent a magnificent group of works from the major legacy of works by Monet that it houses. Also important are the numerous loans from museums and private collections around the world, particularly Europe and the USA.

In the early decades of the 20th century the norms of the new avant-garde movements prevailed, primarily based on the concept of "construction". As a result, Monet's work, like that of most of the Impressionist painters other than Cézanne, was considered out of date and was consequently forgotten. The rediscovery of Monet did not come about until the mid-20th century when young artists of the triumphant Abstract Expressionism movement in the United States began to look at his works with a fresh eye. The emphasis on paint and its application in his work, his "allover" technique, his loose brushstroke and sketchy forms were nothing less than a revelation both for the young generation of Abstract Expressionists in the States and for the followers of European Informalism.

As is habitually the case, the exhibition is divided between the galleries of the Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza and those of Fundación Caja Madrid.

MADRID.- The Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza and Fundación Caja Madrid are presenting the exhibition Monet and Abstraction. It offers a survey of the work of the great French Impressionist painter from an innovative perspective and one never previously employed in the context of a temporary exhibition of this scale and importance, namely the artist's relationship with the development of abstraction in the second half of the 20th century.

From his ethereal London landscapes to the monumental depictions of his garden at Giverny where he spent the last forty years of his life, the exhibition looks at how Claude Monet's permanent obsession with capturing the instantaneous led him to break down pictorial representation to the point of reaching the threshold of abstraction. It also analyses how, around the middle of the 20th century, the young generation of European and American abstract artists rediscovered his art and elevated the figure of Monet to the status of undisputed prophet of the material-based trends within abstraction. Monet thus came to occupy the fundamental role within the history of art that he still maintains today.

Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, Willem de Kooning, Sam Francis, Joan Mitchell, Adolph Gottlieb, André Masson, Philip Guston and Gerhard Richter were among the young artists who turned back to Monet. The present exhibition now offers the chance to see their work in the context of a fascinating dialogue with that of the Impressionist master, revealing numerous connections. Exhibiting Monet's painting in this new way allows for an analysis of the important influence that he exerted on the development of certain aspects of abstraction in the second half of the 20th century and hence his key role in the development of modern art.

More than 100 works have been assembled for this new project, jointly organized by the Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza and Fundación Caja Madrid. It has benefited from the fundamental collaboration of the Musée Marmottan Monet in Paris, where the exhibition will be seen in the summer of 2010 after its Madrid showing. The French museum has lent a magnificent group of works from the major legacy of works by Monet that it houses. Also important are the numerous loans from museums and private collections around the world, particularly Europe and the USA.

Monet was undoubtedly the most celebrated and prolific of the French Impressionists, but he was also the most independent and innovative. His obsession with capturing a sense of the instantaneous, his interest in issues such as the perception of nature and his need to express his personal experience solely through pictorial means led him to break down pictorial representation into an almost abstract atmosphere. Monet's death in December 1926 passed almost unnoticed within the art world of the day. His Grandes Décorations comprising the Water Lilies series, donated to the French State by the artist himself in 1918 and placed on display in 1927, one year after his death, were largely ignored for decades in the Musée de l'Orangerie in Paris.

In the early decades of the 20th century the norms of the new avant-garde movements prevailed, primarily based on the concept of "construction". As a result, Monet's work, like that of most of the Impressionist painters other than Cézanne, was considered out of date and was consequently forgotten. The rediscovery of Monet did not come about until the mid-20th century when young artists of the triumphant Abstract Expressionism movement in the United States began to look at his works with a fresh eye. The emphasis on paint and its application in his work, his "allover" technique, his loose brushstroke and sketchy forms were nothing less than a revelation both for the young generation of Abstract Expressionists in the States and for the followers of European Informalism.

As is habitually the case, the exhibition is divided between the galleries of the Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza and those of Fundación Caja Madrid.

MUSEO THYSSEN-BORNEMISZA
1. Mists and variations

The exhibition opens with a room devoted to the impact that the work of Turner had on Claude Monet during the trips to London that Monet made between 1899 and 1901. A comparison of Turner's work with Monet's paintings of the Thames allows us to appreciate how the play of light across Turner's sparkling pictorial surfaces and his loose, free brushwork influenced Monet's subtle effects in his urban landscapes bathed in the London fog. In addition, the presence in this room of the work of Gerhard Richter, who also executed a series inspired by London, establishes a connection with contemporary abstraction.

artwork: Claude Monet's "Marine, effet de nuit" (R) and Mark Rothko's "Untitled" inauguration of the exhibit "Monet and the Abstraction" at Madrid's Thyssen-Bornemisza museum. REUTERS/Andrea Comas.

2. Effects of light
Monet's sunsets reveal his interest in depicting the changing and ephemeral effects of evening light on the picture surface. The way in which he transformed the rhythms of nature into the expression of his own emotions through a loose, free technique in which the study of colour became the true protagonist, anticipates the chromatic abstractions of later artists such as Mark Rothko and Adolph Gottlieb.

3. Reflections and transparencies
In the rooms devoted to the subject of Water lilies - one of the most important chapters within the artist's late output - Monet reveals a growing interest in reconciling a representative type of art, which he never fully abandoned, and a defence of the material aspects of the paint surface. These works mark a shift in his art from narration to abstraction, a process that is related in the present exhibition to the subtle abstraction of the American painter Helen Frankenthaler.

4. Contrasts of forms
The variations of light, time and atmosphere and the contrasts of forms that arise from the reflection of vegetation on tranquil water captured by Monet in a number of his series were crucial for later artists such as Clyfford Still and Barnett Newman. Their brilliantly coloured shapes with strong effects of backlighting must inevitably be related to the work of Monet.

5. Brushstroke and gesture
The innovative technique used by Monet in the last years of his life paved the way for the abstract idioms of the 20th century. In the final rooms of this first part of the exhibition, paintings from Monet's last period establish a dialogue with abstract works by Jackson Pollock, Lee Krasner, Mark Tobey, Philip Guston, Esteban Vicente, Willem de Kooning and Cy Twombly.

artwork: Willem De Kooning - Untitled II, 1979 Oil on canvas. 195.5 x 223.5 cm. Daros Collection, Switzerland  © The Willem de Kooning Foundation, NY/VEGAP/

FUNDACIÓN CAJA MADRID
6. In the garden at Giverny

Along with the water lilies, the flowers, trees and Japanese bridge in his garden at Giverny were Monet's preferred subjects during the last years of his life. The loose handling of these paintings, in which the paint sometimes runs across the surface of the canvas, anticipates the style and technique of the Abstract Expressionists many years later. During the 1950s various young artists such as Joan Mitchell, Jean-Paul Riopelle, Sam Francis, Zao Wou-Ki and Ellsworth Kelly made Monet's house and garden at Giverny a place of pilgrimage. As can be seen in this section of the exhibition, the discovery of works that remained in Monet's studio provided a crucial stimulus for many key figures of abstraction.

7. In the wake of Monet
Monet's influence can be traced in the work of numerous abstract artists of the second half of the 20th century for a wide variety of reasons. This room presents some of the clear affinities between the work of the French Impressionist painter and artists such as Jean Bazaine, Maria Elena Vieira da Silva, Robert Ryman and Gerhard Richter.

8- Documentation area
This room displays a selection of photographs of Monet and his garden at Giverny (both from the artist's own time and those taken by Henri Cartier-Bresson in the 1950s). It also includes a projection of part of Ceux chez nous, the film made in 1915 by Sacha Guitry in which Monet himself appears alongside other artists including Renoir, Rodin and Edgar Degas.

MUSEO THYSSEN-BORNEMISZA
1. Mists and variations

The exhibition opens with a room devoted to the impact that the work of Turner had on Claude Monet during the trips to London that Monet made between 1899 and 1901. A comparison of Turner's work with Monet's paintings of the Thames allows us to appreciate how the play of light across Turner's sparkling pictorial surfaces and his loose, free brushwork influenced Monet's subtle effects in his urban landscapes bathed in the London fog. In addition, the presence in this room of the work of Gerhard Richter, who also executed a series inspired by London, establishes a connection with contemporary abstraction.

2. Effects of light
Monet's sunsets reveal his interest in depicting the changing and ephemeral effects of evening light on the picture surface. The way in which he transformed the rhythms of nature into the expression of his own emotions through a loose, free technique in which the study of colour became the true protagonist, anticipates the chromatic abstractions of later artists such as Mark Rothko and Adolph Gottlieb.

3. Reflections and transparencies
In the rooms devoted to the subject of Water lilies - one of the most important chapters within the artist's late output - Monet reveals a growing interest in reconciling a representative type of art, which he never fully abandoned, and a defence of the material aspects of the paint surface. These works mark a shift in his art from narration to abstraction, a process that is related in the present exhibition to the subtle abstraction of the American painter Helen Frankenthaler.

4. Contrasts of forms
The variations of light, time and atmosphere and the contrasts of forms that arise from the reflection of vegetation on tranquil water captured by Monet in a number of his series were crucial for later artists such as Clyfford Still and Barnett Newman. Their brilliantly coloured shapes with strong effects of backlighting must inevitably be related to the work of Monet.

5. Brushstroke and gesture
The innovative technique used by Monet in the last years of his life paved the way for the abstract idioms of the 20th century. In the final rooms of this first part of the exhibition, paintings from Monet's last period establish a dialogue with abstract works by Jackson Pollock, Lee Krasner, Mark Tobey, Philip Guston, Esteban Vicente, Willem de Kooning and Cy Twombly.

FUNDACIÓN CAJA MADRID
6. In the garden at Giverny

Along with the water lilies, the flowers, trees and Japanese bridge in his garden at Giverny were Monet's preferred subjects during the last years of his life. The loose handling of these paintings, in which the paint sometimes runs across the surface of the canvas, anticipates the style and technique of the Abstract Expressionists many years later. During the 1950s various young artists such as Joan Mitchell, Jean-Paul Riopelle, Sam Francis, Zao Wou-Ki and Ellsworth Kelly made Monet's house and garden at Giverny a place of pilgrimage. As can be seen in this section of the exhibition, the discovery of works that remained in Monet's studio provided a crucial stimulus for many key figures of abstraction.

7. In the wake of Monet
Monet's influence can be traced in the work of numerous abstract artists of the second half of the 20th century for a wide variety of reasons. This room presents some of the clear affinities between the work of the French Impressionist painter and artists such as Jean Bazaine, Maria Elena Vieira da Silva, Robert Ryman and Gerhard Richter.

8- Documentation area
This room displays a selection of photographs of Monet and his garden at Giverny (both from the artist's own time and those taken by Henri Cartier-Bresson in the 1950s). It also includes a projection of part of Ceux chez nous, the film made in 1915 by Sacha Guitry in which Monet himself appears alongside other artists including Renoir, Rodin and Edgar Degas. Visit : http://www.museothyssen.org//THYSSEN/home

This Week in Review in Art Knowledge News

Posted: 08 Nov 2011 05:40 PM PST

This is a new feature for the subscribers and visitors to Art Knowledge News (AKN), that will enable you to see "thumbnail descriptions" of the last ninety (90) articles and art images that we published. This will allow you to visit any article that you may have missed ; or re-visit any article or image of particular interest. Every day the article "thumbnail images" will change. For you to see the entire last ninety images just click : here .


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